The 100 ‘Wanheda: Part 2’ Review: Conflicted Parties


WARNING: This review contains spoilers

The second part of the The 100 Season 3 premiere, ‘Wanheda: Part 2’, was all about introducing the Ice Nation. Some of the mysteries raised in the first part were resolved here, but many other questions came up. One thing is for sure: Season 3 promises to be the most complicated and crude season of The 100 yet. And that’s saying a lot.

Bellamy & co. had run into some problems last episode, but it seems that it was a group of people from the Ark, including Monty’s mother. Unfortunately, it’s not all good news. Their leader, Pike (Michael Beach), doesn’t believe in Grounders, no matter what Kane and the others try to tell him. The alliance between the Sky people and the Grounders was very hard to achieve, and it would be a shame to see all that go down the drain for no reason. We’ll see where this goes.

Clarke, or ‘Wanheda’, has been captured by Roan (Zach McGowan), a Grounder who at first seemed to be a Lincoln 2.0. However, it turns out that he had just made a deal with the Ice Queen to bring her Wanheda in exchange for him being welcomed back to the clan. We had already heard about the Ice Nation (Azgeda) and Queen Nia, but this is the first time we actually get to see it. Not Queen Nia, though, as for some reason, Lexa has taken her place. Apparently, she had just asked for Clarke to be brought to her because she wanted to talk to her. Obviously, Clarke isn’t having any of that, and proceeds to give the fandom one of the best gifs in The 100 history.

Wanheda: Part 2 - The 100 - The Daily Fandom

This time, a lot more focus is put on the City of Light, as it is confirmed that it is actual a mental place one can only reach by swallowing a pill. Out of everything that happened, the “there is no pain in the City of Light” line is the one that stood out the most to me. Considering the daily hell our characters live in, a land where pain doesn’t exist seems like a very appealing option. Murhpy and Emori are still not convinced, though. I’ll admit I wasn’t sure of what they were planning to do with Murphy in the second season and I found myself waiting for him to get killed. However, he does make an excellent team with Emori, and the series seems to want us to take their side this time. How all of this is related to the main storyline remains to be seen.

Perhaps the least interesting part of the episode was going back to Mount Weather to get a blood transfusion for Nyko, who was badly hurt. Still, this was necessary for Jasper, who had just been told by Abby to face his feelings. Last week I talked about how The 100 treats wounds and injuries realistically, same thing applies for feelings and emotions. You can’t get over losing someone so close to you so quickly, and both Jasper and Clarke show signs of PTSD, which is totally understandable after what they have seen/done.

Honestly, I didn’t enjoy ‘Wanheda: Part 2’ as much as its first part. Although, to be fair, I did enjoy the first part A LOT. Last week was more about bringing our characters back and explaining what everyone had been doing for those 3 months, while this second part was more about exposition and less about character dynamics (we didn’t see Raven!) and felt more slower-paced overall. ‘A war is brewing’, said Lexa, and isn’t that always the case with The 100? What might be different this time is that not even people within the same group seem to agree anymore. Sure, that has always been a thing, but not to this extent. Grounders keep having their conflicts, a new group of humans doesn’t agree with the truce with the Groundres, and the City of Light promises to be all a big fat lie. After all, The 100 has always been about people disagreeing with each other and having different points of view, which is what makes it stand out from other apocalyptic shows. I believe that they will be able to translate these advantages to a much bigger scale.


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24-year-old TV journalist. I especialize in fangirling over TV shows and anime. Currently fighting for fan studies to be recognized as a valid academic field.

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